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Richard L. Cassin Publisher and Editor

Andy Spalding Senior Editor

Jessica Tillipman Senior Editor

Elizabeth K. Spahn Editor Emeritus

Cody Worthington Contributing Editor

Julie DiMauro Contributing Editor

Thomas Fox Contributing Editor

Marc Alain Bohn Contributing Editor

Bill Waite Contributing Editor

Shruti J. Shah Contributing Editor

Russell A. Stamets Contributing Editor

Richard Bistrong Contributing Editor 

Eric Carlson Contributing Editor

Bill Steinman Contributing Editor

Aarti Maharaj Contributing Editor


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Entries in Tyco (8)

Thursday
May082014

Most Saudis think graft, nepotism are on the rise

A survey by Saudi Arabia's National Anti-Corruption Commission found that 67.8 percent of the respondents believe financial and state corruption is on the rise in the country.

Click to read more ...

Tuesday
May062014

Are Administrative Proceedings the New Civil Complaints?

Click to enlargeAt ACI's annual FCPA Conference last November, SEC FCPA Unit Chief Kara N. Brockmeyer disclosed that the SEC expects to rely more frequently on administrative proceedings (as opposed to more traditional civil court actions) to resolve FCPA-related enforcement matters.

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Friday
Dec072012

The FCPA versus global terrorism

Innovative uses of anti-corruption laws to fight terrorists and tyrants and companies that help them is the subject of a breakthrough article published this week by the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania.

Click to read more ...

Monday
Oct012012

Enforcement Report for Q3 '12

During the quarter just ended, there were five corporate FCPA enforcement actions, one enforcement against an individual by the SEC, four criminal sentencings of individuals, and three and a half corporate declinations.

Here's what happened:

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Monday
Sep242012

Tyco in $26 million settlement with DOJ and SEC 

Tyco International Ltd. agreed on Monday to pay criminal and civil penalties totaling more than $26 million to resolve Foreign Corrupt Practices Act violations.

Click to read more ...

Monday
Aug062012

The FCPA's Long Shadow

How long should the DOJ and SEC keep self reporting companies on the hook?

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Wednesday
Mar112009

On The Subject Of Resources

We've mentioned before Dan Newcomb's FCPA Digest, calling it the most definitive publicly-available catalog of FCPA prosecutions, enforcement actions and disclosed investigations. So it's great to see the release of the March 2009 version, available here.

This year, Philip Urofsky becomes editor-in-chief. He told us last week, "In this Digest, we entirely scrapped the previous Trends & Patterns, which had largely become a statistical update, and replaced it with a more analytical piece." The T&P section has always been a favorite of ours, and this year's new-and-improved version (available here) didn't disappoint.

About the prosecution of individuals, for example, it said:

More recently, there is a strong trend of actions against individuals being brought separately or even in advance of charges against their employers and then, in all likelihood, following classic prosecutorial strategy of working up the chain of command, using the individuals to build the government’s case against their superiors and eventually the company. In Willbros, the DOJ charged four employees over a two-year period, with two pleading in previous years (Steph and Brown) and an indictment being returned against two others (Tillery and Novak) in February 2008. Finally, in May 2008, Willbros Group and Willbros International agreed to a deferred prosecution agreement. Similarly, the DOJ entered into a plea agreement with the former CEO of KBR, Stanley, in 2008, well in advance of settling the matter with Halliburton/KBR in early 2009.
And concerning disgorgement, a topic we recently talked about here, it said:
A final trend and pattern worth noting is the SEC’s continued demand for disgorgement of ill-gotten profits in cases in which only books & records violations are charged, such as in the [oil for food] cases. Whether or not a false entry in a company’s books and records (or a failure to implement adequate internal controls) truly results in increased profits is open to question. To date, however, no FCPA defendant has publicly challenged the SEC on whether disgorgement is appropriate when the sole charge is false books and records. Prior to the ABB case in 2004, the SEC had never collected disgorgement in FCPA cases; since then it has sought it in virtually every case with only a few exceptions, such as Dow Chemical, Delta & Pine Land, Lucent, and Conway. In Tyco, the SEC collected $1 in ill-gotten gains (along with $50 million in penalties related to other violations). While this is an isolated example of the SEC seeking such nominal disgorgement, the case does underscore the overall policy of levying disgorgement sanctions in nearly all cases against issuers.
We spend a lot of time in the FCPA Digest. And whenever we turn to it, we're grateful for the hard work and generosity of founding-editor Dan Newcomb, Philip Urofsky and their entire team.
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Thursday
Mar272008

Roll Call

It was just two weeks ago that we were waxing about the quiet times for FCPA watchers, due to the temporary bottleneck in the appointment of corporate monitors. But come to think of it, the Justice Department's Fraud Section, the group in charge of FCPA enforcement, has a lot on its mind right now.

In addition to the monitor controversy, there are sensitive investigations of BAE and Saudi Prince Bandar, along with Siemens, Panalpina and most of the oil and gas services industry. Giant insurance brokerage Aon announced an FCPA investigation. Medtronic is under the microscope with the rest of the leading orthopedic device makers (whose deferred prosecution agreements in their domestic bribery cases helped ignite the aforementioned controversy about corporate monitors).

Last week, even stolid Alcoa joined the FCPA line up, courtesy of an inexplicable federal civil suit filed against it by Bahrain's Alba (in Pittsburgh, of all places) -- which the DOJ promptly stayed while it plays investigative catch-up. And let's not forget that at least three dozen other companies have disclosed yet-unresolved FCPA investigations over the past few years -- Shell recently became one of them (see also Panalpina, above); Halliburton and DaimlerChrysler are two others. And there's Total, ABB, Bristol Myers Squibb, Tyco and . . . . well, it's a long list.

So it's not a quiet time over at the DOJ after all. That means the hardworking people there can be forgiven for little things, like gremlins making mischief on their FCPA Opinion Procedure Release website. Sometimes Releases disappear. This time, it's Release 08-01. When it was published earlier this year, we posted about it here, and it should be accessible as a pdf file here. As a reminder, Release 08-01 is the wordiest on record. It's about a proposed investment in an overseas privatization, and describes in detail the due diligence for the deal, protracted negotiations over the parties' compliance rights and obligations, and some final, remedial due diligence. In other words, it's packed with issues, action and guidance -- so it might come in handy.

Quiet times for the FCPA? Not nearly. In fact, when the dam breaks for the appointment of new corporate monitors, which should be any day now, we're expecting the busiest FCPA enforcement season ever.