Search

Editors

Richard L. Cassin Publisher and Editor

Andy Spalding Senior Editor

Jessica Tillipman Senior Editor

Elizabeth K. Spahn Editor Emeritus

Cody Worthington Contributing Editor

Julie DiMauro Contributing Editor

Thomas Fox Contributing Editor

Marc Alain Bohn Contributing Editor

Bill Waite Contributing Editor

Shruti J. Shah Contributing Editor

Russell A. Stamets Contributing Editor

Richard Bistrong Contributing Editor 

Eric Carlson Contributing Editor

Bill Steinman Contributing Editor

Aarti Maharaj Contributing Editor


Connect
FCPA Blog Daily News

Entries in Movies (4)

Friday
Sep132013

Cameo Corruption, Conclusion: Zero Dark Third-Party Intermediaries 

In the previous four posts, we examined how the practice of allowing public officials to appear in films could be used as an alternative method of bribery. While we’ve focused on the idea of a foreign official receiving a cameo, the analysis actually applies to anyone who has a substantial enough connection to a foreign official. After all, the FCPA prohibits bribery through third-party intermediaries. So how should Hollywood behave when doling out film roles abroad?

Click to read more ...

Thursday
Sep122013

Cameo Corruption, Part IV: Intent and the Inherent License to Produce a Film

This is the fourth of five posts looking at Hollywood’s practice of giving film cameos to politicians and how this practice would play in an FCPA context.

Click to read more ...

Wednesday
Sep112013

Cameo Corruption, Part III: Meeting the Business Purpose Test Automatically

As we’ve seen in Part I and Part II of this series, a political cameo is valuable enough to operate as a bribe, but does Hollywood really need to worry about the practice exposing it to FCPA liability?

Click to read more ...

Tuesday
Sep102013

Cameo Corruption, Part II: Valuating a Film Role

In the first post of this series, I talked about the possibility that political cameos, if used abroad, might serve as an alternative method of corruption. It makes sense to begin the inquiry by valuating a cameo. After all, if a brief appearance on screen isn’t worth much, then it’s unlikely to induce a foreign official to abuse her discretion.

Click to read more ...