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Entries in Ikea (9)

Tuesday
Jan272015

International Franchising and the FCPA (Part Two): A Flock of Foreign Officials 

This post continues from Part One: Vicarious Liability. There are several types of foreign officials that interact with a franchise’s broad array of potential agents abroad, which generates anti-corruption risks.

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Tuesday
Dec022014

How the IKEA series came to be

Since the FCPA Blog published my series on IKEA’s charitable contributions in Russia, I've received a lot of positive feedback, both directly and indirectly. That is incredibly flattering, and I want to thank everyone for taking that all-important first step: reading what I wrote.

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Monday
Nov242014

IKEA’s charitable giving in Russia and the FCPA (Part Six)

This is the final post in my series analyzing IKEA’s charitable contributions in Russia in the 1990s and early 2000s. I haven’t presumed IKEA was subject to the FCPA when the events happened or that any FCPA violations might have occurred. Instead, I’ve looked at IKEA’s Russia experience to learn more about charitable giving under the FCPA and how to manage giving programs.

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Friday
Nov212014

IKEA’s charitable giving in Russia and the FCPA (Part Five)

This is the fifth post in our series about IKEA’s charitable contributions in Russia in the 1990s and early 2000s. Today we’re looking at an event that at first glance doesn’t even appear to be a donation.

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Thursday
Nov202014

IKEA’s charitable giving in Russia and the FCPA (Part Four)

In this series, we’re looking at IKEA’s charitable contributions in Russia during its expansion there in the 1990s and early 2000s. In Parts Two and Three, I presented quotes from the memoir of the former CEO of IKEA Russia, Lennart Dahlgren. He describes with apparent candor why some of the charitable contributions were made and the impact they had on IKEA’s business. We continue the analysis here, reviewing an episode related to IKEA’s attempt to open a shopping mall, MEGA.

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Wednesday
Nov192014

IKEA’s charitable giving in Russia and the FCPA (Part Three)

I discussed in Part 2 how a donation in line with the interests of deputy governor of Moscow Region, Mikhail Men’, helped IKEA resolve its problems relating to construction of its second store in the Moscow Region. This time we look at IKEA’s efforts to build a distribution center.

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Tuesday
Nov182014

IKEA’s charitable giving in Russia and the FCPA (Part Two)

This is the second post in a series analyzing IKEA’s charitable contributions during its expansion efforts in Russia during the late 1990s and early 2000s. In the first post, I talked about Lennart Dahlgren’s memoir, Despite Absurdity: How I Conquered Russia While It Conquered Me, which has not been published in English. And I summarized the DOJ’s guidance on charitable contributions under the FCPA.

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Monday
Nov172014

IKEA’s charitable giving in Russia and the FCPA (Part One)

When I was about to go work in Russia in 2012, somebody suggested that I read Lennart Dahlgren’s memoir, Despite Absurdity: How I Conquered Russia While It Conquered Me. Dahlgren, the CEO of IKEA Russia during the late 1990s and early 2000s, was instrumental in establishing the furniture giant there.

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Tuesday
Apr222014

EU adopts broad compliance disclosure rule

The European Parliament passed a new law on April 15 to force about 6,000 EU companies to disclose information about environmental compliance, human rights, bribery and corruption.

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